• Conservation You Can Taste:   Saving Forgotten Fruits of the Borderlands

    Conservation You Can Taste: Saving Forgotten Fruits of the Borderlands

    Three hundred years ago, Spanish missionaries introduced a suite of arid-adapted fruit and herb varieties to the Sonoran Desert region, many of which have barely survived to this day.

    These desert-adapted, heirloom fruits enriched the diets and diversified the farms indigenous and immigrants alike, but fell out of availability and culinary fashion. Today, these forgotten fruits are once again needed because they are tolerant of heat, drought and even alkaline conditions.

  • Cumin, Camels, and Caravans: A Spice Odyssey

    Cumin, Camels, and Caravans: A Spice Odyssey

    The closest we armchair travellers normally get to the olfactory sensation of walking through the globe’s most fragrant souks is opening the doors of our spice cupboards. The bottles may be sealed shut but the aroma of their contents —cardamom and cumin, cinnamon and saffron, turmeric and vanilla — wafts towards our nostrils and for a brief moment we are not in our kitchens but strolling through the spice markets of Arabia, Asia or Africa.

  • Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

    Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

    With climatic uncertainty now “the new normal,” many farmers, gardeners, and orchardists in North America are desperately seeking ways to adapt how they grow food in the face of climate change. The solutions may be at our back door.

    In Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, Nabhan, one of the world’s experts on the agricultural traditions of arid lands, draws from the knowledge of traditional farmers in the Gobi Desert, the Arabian Peninsula, the Sahara Desert, and Andalusia, as well as the Sonoran, Chihuahuan, and Painted deserts of North America…

  • Desert Terroir, Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands

    Desert Terroir, Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands

    Why does food taste better when you know where it comes from? Because history—ecological, cultural, even personal—flavors every bite we eat. Whether it’s the volatile chemical compounds that a plant absorbs from the soil or the stories and memories of places that are evoked by taste, layers of flavor await those willing to delve into the roots of real food. In this landmark book, Gary Paul Nabhan takes us on a personal trip into the southwestern borderlands to discover the terroir—the “taste of the place”—that makes this desert so delicious.

  • Gary Paul Nabhan: Mother Nature’s Foodie

    Gary Paul Nabhan: Mother Nature’s Foodie

    Local and sustainable are on the tips of many tongues as more and more people try to eat food that’s good for them and the planet. If you’re a part of this important conversation, you can thank Gary Paul Nabhan for helping to get it started. A Lebanese American living in the Southwestern United States, Nabhan has for more than three decades been writing books, directing research projects, forming farming alliances …

  • Chasing Chiles - Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail

    Chasing Chiles – Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail

    Chasing Chiles looks at both the future of place-based foods and the effects of climate change on agriculture through the lens of the chile pepper—from the farmers who cultivate this iconic crop to the cuisines and cultural traditions in which peppers play a huge role. Why chile peppers? Both a spice and a vegetable, chile […]

  • Our Farm

    Our Farm

    Come on Down to the Farm Gary Nabhan and his wife Laurie Monti have recently purchased a five and a half acre farmstead above the Native Seeds/SEARCH growout farm, where they are demonstrating how desert-adapted agro-biodiversity can be integrated into water-conserving farming systems for climate-friendly food production. Their farmstead is named Almuniya de los Zopilotes—Private […]

Recent Entries

Gary Nabhan: Seeds of Change

Gary Nabhan: Seeds of Change

The next time you are putting a slice of tomato on your sandwich, ask yourself where it came from. Not which area of the country, but which seed stock.

One of the often overlooked aspects of food insecurity amid climate uncertainty is the push by big agricultural interests to get us to buy their seeds and their seeds only.

Flowers, Creatures & Contemplatives Embracing One Another in the Wilderness World

Flowers, Creatures & Contemplatives Embracing One Another in the Wilderness World

Among the earliest memories imprinted in my mind: Sitting alone in the sands of the Indiana Dunes when I was three, maybe four years old. Listening.

The late afternoon sun was cascading diagonally down through the canopies of oaks & cottonwoods above me. A squabble of Blue Jays appeared to be my only companions for well over an hour. I became mesmerized by their presences.

The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge in Curbing the Loss of Language and Biodiversity

The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge in Curbing the Loss of Language and Biodiversity

Biodiversity inventory, monitoring, and species-recovery efforts can be advanced by a dynamic collaboration of Western, citizen, and ethnoscience. Indigenous and local traditional knowledge of place-based biodiversity is perhaps the oldest scientific tradition on earth.

We illustrate how an all taxa biodiversity inventory network of projects in collaboration with the Comcaac (Seri people) in northwestern Mexico is advancing not only biosystematics but also species recovery, habitat restoration, language conservation and maintenance, and the maintenance of traditional livelihoods.

Jim Harrison was More Than Just a Pretty Face and Patagonia’s Finest Writer

Jim Harrison was More Than Just a Pretty Face and Patagonia’s Finest Writer

Less than a week before Jim Harrison passed from our immediate presence, I had the presence of sitting at a picnic table at the Wagon Wheel Saloon drinking beer with him, his daughter Jamie, his bird-hunting partner J.B. Miller, and my wife Laurie.

Although Jim was likely suffering chronic pain from back injuries, as well as from shingles and gout, he spoke with great affection and gratitude that his daughter Jamie had come down from the Livingston, Montana to spend time with him.