Category: Features

Gary Nabhan: Seeds of Change

Gary Nabhan: Seeds of Change

The next time you are putting a slice of tomato on your sandwich, ask yourself where it came from. Not which area of the country, but which seed stock.

One of the often overlooked aspects of food insecurity amid climate uncertainty is the push by big agricultural interests to get us to buy their seeds and their seeds only.

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Flowers, Creatures & Contemplatives Embracing One Another in the Wilderness World

Flowers, Creatures & Contemplatives Embracing One Another in the Wilderness World

Among the earliest memories imprinted in my mind: Sitting alone in the sands of the Indiana Dunes when I was three, maybe four years old. Listening.

The late afternoon sun was cascading diagonally down through the canopies of oaks & cottonwoods above me. A squabble of Blue Jays appeared to be my only companions for well over an hour. I became mesmerized by their presences.

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The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge in Curbing the Loss of Language and Biodiversity

The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge in Curbing the Loss of Language and Biodiversity

Biodiversity inventory, monitoring, and species-recovery efforts can be advanced by a dynamic collaboration of Western, citizen, and ethnoscience. Indigenous and local traditional knowledge of place-based biodiversity is perhaps the oldest scientific tradition on earth.

We illustrate how an all taxa biodiversity inventory network of projects in collaboration with the Comcaac (Seri people) in northwestern Mexico is advancing not only biosystematics but also species recovery, habitat restoration, language conservation and maintenance, and the maintenance of traditional livelihoods.

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Jim Harrison was More Than Just a Pretty Face and Patagonia’s Finest Writer

Jim Harrison was More Than Just a Pretty Face and Patagonia’s Finest Writer

Less than a week before Jim Harrison passed from our immediate presence, I had the presence of sitting at a picnic table at the Wagon Wheel Saloon drinking beer with him, his daughter Jamie, his bird-hunting partner J.B. Miller, and my wife Laurie.

Although Jim was likely suffering chronic pain from back injuries, as well as from shingles and gout, he spoke with great affection and gratitude that his daughter Jamie had come down from the Livingston, Montana to spend time with him.

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